Startups: How To Build A Barrier To Entry With Inbound Marketing

About This Blog

This site is for  entrepreneurs.  A full RSS feed to the articles is available.  Please subscribe so we know you're out there.  If you need more convincing, learn more about the site.

Community

Google+

And, you can find me on Google+

Connect on Twitter

Get Articles By Email

Your email:

Google

Blog Navigator

Navigate By : 
[Article Index]

Questions about startups?

If you have questions about startups, you can find me and a bunch of other startup fanatics on the free Q&A website:

Answers.OnStartups.com

Subscribe to Updates

 

30,000+ subscribers can't all be wrong.  Subscribe to the OnStartups.com RSS feed.

Follow me on LinkedIn

OnStartups

Current Articles | RSS Feed RSS Feed

Startups: How To Build A Barrier To Entry With Inbound Marketing

 

I’ve been doing a fair amount of speaking lately.  It’s partly driven by my recently released book, Inbound Marketing: Get Found Using Google, Social Media and Blogs (which is doing exceptionally well -- more below on this). The topics I usually speak on are startups (surprise) and marketing (surprise, surprise).  And, when I’m really on a roll and feeling adventurous, I talk about startup marketing. inbound marketing book

First off, a quick confession.  I’m not really a marketer, and I don’t play one on TV.  I’ve never had the word marketing in my job title, ever.  The closest I’ve come to any formal academic training in marketing are two marketing classes I took in grad school.  Neither of them were really about marketing a startup (they were about pricing and branding and other high falutin’ stuff).  So, much of what I’ve learned about startup marketing has been through (gasp!) actually doing it

Now, I want to lead with the fundamental premise of this article: 

Exceptional marketing can be a formidable barrier to entry. 

For those of you that are new to the investor game (which is usually where the phrase turns up), “barrier to entry” is loosely defined as that thing which makes it hard for competitors to enter your market and reduce your profits.  In most cases, when VCs ask a startup about barriers to entry, the response usually falls into one of two categories:onstartups barrier

Type 1:  We’re doing something that is so hard to do that few others can do it.  This is usually manifests in the form of some intellectual property (IP) like source code.

Type 2:  We’ve got exclusive/proprietary access to some important resource that others can’t get to.  This could be in the form of some product integration partnership (like bit.ly has with Twitter).

Of course, there are other types of barriers to entry, but the above two types capture most of what you’re likely to hear — and software entrepreneurs are often focused on the first one (i.e. "lets build a kick-ass product that’s really hard and others can’t replicate because we’re just so freakin’ awesome").  Nothing wrong with that.  I’m a big fan of doing really hard things that you’ve got a rare talent for and others can’t easily emulate.  However, it’s entirely possible that late at night, when you’re talking to yourself, you might say “Self, I know my application is cool and all, but honestly, I don’t think it’s that hard to build.”  Be comforted in the knowledge that most software being built is not particularly hard to recreate.  So, the question is, if it’s not the software that’s going to be your barrier to entry, and you’re not fortunate enough to have a lock on some proprietary resource, what do you do?  My advice:  Get phenomenally good at acquiring customers efficiently.  The emphasis is on the word “efficiently”.

So, here are some thoughts and insights on how I think you can build a barrier to entry with marketing:

How To Build A Barrier To Entry With Inbound Marketing

1. Getting good at spending money doesn’t count.  Your strategy shouldn’t be “go raise a bunch of money, then use that money to go buy your way to some customers. Then, make it up in volume.”  Though that can certainly work, that’s not a defensible barrier to entry.  Just about anyone can spend money (some smarter than others).  You need to focus on creativity, not cash.  More on this later.

2. PPC (Pay-Per-Click) can be effective, but will not protect you.  One of the popular forms of marketing today is pay-per-click advertising through programs like Google AdWords.  I’ve seen entrepreneurs get really, really good at figuring out just the right bidding strategy and figuring out precisely how much they can afford to spend on a given word based on their conversion rate and lifetime value of the customer.  This is all fine and good, except for one thing.  PPC programs like AdWords run as a real-time auction.  She who pays gets the clicks.  It’s easier to describe why this is a problem with an example:  Let’s say that you’re building a web-based app for home theatre installers (random example that I just made up).  Let’s also say that over time, and with some maniacal focus and PPC bidding ninja skills, you figure out that you can afford to pay up to about $2.76 a click based on the traffic that these clicks generate, how many clicks lead to purchases, and the value of each purchase.  Life is good.  For every $1 you put in to the PPC machine, something > $1 comes out.  This goes on for weeks/months.  Then, all of a sudden, you wake up one morning, check your analytics and discover that for some reason, the price for your most important keyword went up.  Way up.  Enough that your morning coffee comes shooting out your nose.  After some poking around on the Interwebs, you find out that some lame startup on the other coast just raised $5 million from some lame VC.  They just emerged from the shower freshly sprinkled with a new round of funding, hired a VP of Marketing who then went out and started buying AdWords.  Your AdWords.  The real tragedy with this story is that this competitor is not all that bright.  They don’t know that they can’t really afford to pay that much for a click and make profits (they’re not thinking about profits — they just raised a bunch of money).  Your problem is not that they’re super-smart, it’s that they’re super-ignorant.  And that’s the thing with PPC.  You’re basically at the mercy of the stupidest market entrant.  Call me simple-minded, but that doesn’t sound like a particularly effective barrier to entry when someone can just come along and drive your cost of customer acquisition (COCA) up.  And, it doesn’t happen overnight — it happens immediately

3. Get spectacularly good at search engine optimization (SEO).  Instead of becoming really, really good at PPC, invest in the time and energy to become an SEO-ninja instead.  The first reason for this is that SEO is cheaper.  Not free (generally), but free on a marginal basis.  Here’s why:  In PPC, each additional click costs you money (based on the cost-per-click).  Want 1,000 more clicks?  You pay for all of them.  For SEO, once you’re ranking well and getting traffic, the clicks don’t cost you anything.  It’s going to take some time/energy to rank in the first place, but once you do, life is good.  Further, unlike PPC, SEO does not reward the stupidest market entrant.  Someone that’s new to the game can’t just walk right in and snatch your #1 ranking.  Granted, they can spend some money and eventually get there, but it’s not going to be immediate and you’ll probably see it coming.  (All you have to do is watch the search engine results for your favorite keywords and see who’s creeping up on you).  So, unlike PPC, the presence and skills you build in SEO-land are much more sustainble and defensible.  In fact, if you’re out raising money, being able to demonstrate that you’ve got strong rankings for traffic-generating keywords is a major, major plus. 

4. Create content that kicks butt.  It’s really simple.  If you produce things that are useful/interesting to your target customers — you win.  You win by drawing people in to your business not because you had the largest marketing budget, but because you created something of value.  The kind of stuff that people tweet about, link to in their blogs and and share with their friends.  That’s magical.  The type of content can be varied.  At my startup HubSpot, we’ve tried lots of different things: “normal” blog articles, music videos, parody videos, songs, cartoons — and of course, free marketing tools.  For most startups, if you took every dollar you would have spent on advertising to try and beat your prospects over the head in the hopes that they’ll buy from you and instead spent that dollar on actually producing useful content, you’d win.  Seriously win.  This worked so well for us that almost all of our increase in marketing spend is allocated towards hiring people that can produce content.  They make videos, write blogs, create research reports and develop software tools.  The beauty of this content is that long after you’ve invested in creating it, it’ll continue to generate traffic and leads.  To this day, some of the early articles I wrote for our marketing blog drive consistent cash into our bank account.  We don’t have to spend a penny for those leads.  I’ll summarize again in four words:  Create content.  It works. 

So, I want you to imagine this:  Imagine that you’ve got a business that is exceptionally good at pulling customers in by the truck-load.  Not by spending money on outbound marketng (like advertising, spam, telemarketing and direct mail), but organically because they think the stuff you have to say is just so freakin’ awesome.  People are shouting from the virtual twitter rooftops about how great you are.  They’re so mind-bogglingly happy that they’re writing entire blog articles talking about your company and your product.  And you don’t have to pay them a penny.  Now imagine that some competitor emerges, raises money from Sequoia and comes after you.  Do you think it’ll be easy for them to reproduce that magic that you’ve built?  Nope.  It’s hard.  And that, my friends, is what I call a bonafide barrier to entry.

On a closing note, I’m going to ask you a favor.  It has been less than 36 hours since my book, Inbound Marketing has been available in bookstores nationwide.  Today was the big “release” day.  Already, it’s in the Amazon Top 100 business books list, and the #6 book on marketing (if you helped make that happen, thanks!)  The entire book is about pulling customers in.  I wrote it not to make money (it’s near impossible to make money writing a book), but to try and convince more people — especially startup founders, that inbound marketing is a better way to go.  So, you should buy the book. To make it easier for you, I’ll give you my personal, one-question asked, money-back guarantee.  If you buy the book and don’t find it useful, just tweet me @dharmesh and I’ll send you $25 via PayPal.  (The only question I’ll ask you is “what should I do to make it useful so people that read the next edition don’t waste their time?”).

Oh, and for whatever reason, if you owe me a favor (or $25), this is a great karmic-loop way to pay me back. For some reason, even though the money made is miniscule, I get some emotional gratification from seeing the book do well.  And, $25 is a small price to pay for my emotional betterment, don’t you think?  OK, that’s enough guilt for one blog article.  Go buy the book on Amazon.  Then, copy-and paste this message into twitter — “I let @dharmesh talk me into buying his book (http://InboundMarketingBook.com). You should too". 

Or, just click here to tweet it.

Thanks a bunch for your support and apologies for the shameless promotion this time (I don't do it that often).  I promise to get back to my regular shameful promotion next week, once the newness of being a first-time author has worn off.

Oh, and what do you think about exceptional marketing being a barrier to entry?  Agree or disagree that this could work?

Posted by Dharmesh Shah on Tue, Oct 20, 2009

COMMENTS

Great article - I hope you sell many books and your emotional betterment is guaranteed. :-) 
 
I think you make a great point with PPC and Creating Content. What draws people to PPC rather than SEO? PPC is easier. Period. For SEO to work, great content has to anyway be delivered. A great blog must be written often. Relationships must be built with other bloggers and sites so that linking can take place. And many companies, large or small, are afraid of this area because they don't know what to say or how to create content. 
 
And then there is that entire "control" issue that holds them back as well... how are they to go from a tightly controlled communication method, to Social Media?? I can already see the terror in their eyes before I can even say "Social Media Policy."

posted on Tuesday, October 20, 2009 at 8:53 AM by Gunes Yilmaztuerk


Best wishes for great sales, Dharmesh, and I agree with the value of SEO. We took one company to #1 on Google News just by SEO content managing press releases over a period of time, and by first determining what the target audience would be searching for in terms of keywords. Gunes has a valuable point to make, in that many people have heard of/think they understand PPC, and generating consistent SEO quality content is more difficult. But perhaps SEO content is not so challenging, if the company focuses on writing about its success, over and over again, in terms that its known or presumed market will be looking for. Just as it may take some 50 repetitions to learn a new vocabulary word, or 9-12 times to take action on a new product exposure, some startups may quit the SEO process too soon. Again, best wishes, Dharmesh, and congrats on your #6 position on Amazon!

posted on Tuesday, October 20, 2009 at 9:07 AM by Ernest Troth


Your point about PPC is so true. IT's another example of the inaccuracy of efficient market theory. PPC auctions don't rise and fall to a defensible market price based on individuals' rational self interest. They rise and fall based on trends, idiocy, and total irrationality. 
 
PPC is a worthwhile tool, but it certainly is not a long-term strategy.

posted on Tuesday, October 20, 2009 at 9:08 AM by Adam Wood


Hi Dharmesh, 
do you do mentoring to start-ups ?? To be specific to technology start ups ??? If so how can we be in touch ?? I would suppose that I am leaving my email address here so you can contact me back if you feel like helping me. 
Regardless thanks very much for this post. 

posted on Tuesday, October 20, 2009 at 9:08 AM by Mihir


Great post and great advice. I am very tempted to part with $16.47 (amazon.com price). Hubspot rocks!

posted on Tuesday, October 20, 2009 at 9:11 AM by Robert Parrish


Excellent article. Your reference to "reproducing that magic" is right on target in describing the factors of success for firms utilizing Web 2.0 correctly.  
 
What I communicate to all my clients and partners around the world, is that money spent on advertising to expose a company's basic services versus money spent on producing useful content to expose a company's "magic ingredient" are two different things.  
 
In an uncluttered market with few competitors, the first is de riguer... while in our current noisy web culture, the second creates incredible exposure, credibility, and profound relationships with prospects which lead to revenues. 
 
The additional beauty of having a system to create timely content allows a company to meet any unforeseen market changes by modifying and reasserting their "value proposition" in all web messages and, more importantly, in making their expertise and capabilities relevant in any type of economy. 
 
Best of luck in your new book's release. Complimentary copies are most welcome ;) 
 
Anthony Paraskevas 
STTRATEGIX consulting 
(Marketing, Business Development, Digital Communications, and Strategic Alliances) 
Skype: StrategixConsulting 
Email: LinkedinANTHONY@gmail.com 
LinkedIN: www.linkedin.com/in/AnthonyParaskevas 
Web: www.strategix.ca

posted on Tuesday, October 20, 2009 at 9:14 AM by Anthony Paraskevas


I don't read many blogs all the way through but this one really held my interest. I love writing blogs but admit it is time consuming and I often feel I should be doing 'real' work so thanks too for the permission to keep on writing. 
 
Off now to buy the book 
Many thanks 
 
Charlotte 
www.quicklearn.co.uk

posted on Tuesday, October 20, 2009 at 9:14 AM by Charlotte Mannion


3 and 4 is key. but lets face it, the more money you have the more of this you can get done better or by others.

posted on Tuesday, October 20, 2009 at 9:15 AM by Scopulus


Absolutely agree! This has been SocialGrow's strategy from day one. 
 
 
 
We created our home page in Wordpress and have been blogging to get in the Google sandbox and build our SEO ranking. We don't have many visitors yet, but that will change. 
 
 
 
Ken Herron is a pro at using social media marketing for free to build brand awareness. We want to be the first to market with our kind of product and with marketing and user experience build users fast so that late entrants can't compete. 
 
 
 
Check out our Animoto video at http://bit.ly/Aka84 for a little entertainment. 
 
 
 
Perfect article. 
 
 
 
Marsh Sutherland 
 
President | Co-Founder 
 
SocialGrow

posted on Tuesday, October 20, 2009 at 9:19 AM by Marsh Sutherland


Great content. Thanks!

posted on Tuesday, October 20, 2009 at 9:20 AM by Martin O'Connor


We launched Daily Grommet a year ago today...the same time the capital markets shut. So we took our short dollars and invested 90% of them in creating great (and totally monetizable) content. It was really fun to read your blog post "endorsing" our big bet--on our birthday. Thanks Dharmesh. And congrats on the new funding!

posted on Tuesday, October 20, 2009 at 9:26 AM by Jules Pieri


Great article! Definitely something that needs to be talked more about. What used to work no longer works when establishing a strong business and setting up those "barriers." Build a following, turn that into a community, give "ownership" of the community TO the community and they will never leave you (unless sorely wronged) and THEY will do all the "marketing" to attract new customers. Fantastic! AND... I'll be sure to check out the book!

posted on Tuesday, October 20, 2009 at 9:27 AM by Brian Hamlett


I can see why your book is doing so well. This is excellent stuff. I think this mindset is here to stay.

posted on Tuesday, October 20, 2009 at 9:32 AM by Geoff


I usually don't finish blogs. They often fizz after the first intro. Yours was good all the way through. Very good ideas. Thanks.

posted on Tuesday, October 20, 2009 at 9:49 AM by Paul


Congratulations on the release of your book. Thank you for the very insightful article!

posted on Tuesday, October 20, 2009 at 9:59 AM by Sandy Tam


One of the wonderful things about Inbound Marketing is that not many people really 'get it', or are unable to deliver quality content. If only everyone knew how powerful it can be, on one hand it would make things a bit tougher for the Inbound Marketers of the world, but on the other, there would be a lot more kick-ass content out there. 
 
Thanks D, looking forward to the book. 
~Michael

posted on Tuesday, October 20, 2009 at 10:37 AM by Michael Bungartz


Well done Dhamesh. We are a new SaaS start up in Europe and totally convinced by the inbound marketing philosophy as a competitive barrier to entry. I look forward to reading your book

posted on Tuesday, October 20, 2009 at 10:40 AM by Noel Shannon


Sorry to have misspelt your name Dharmesh !!

posted on Tuesday, October 20, 2009 at 10:41 AM by Noel Shannon


Dear Dharmesh 
 
 
 
Very interesting. Infact working on somthing similar for our startup and hope to draw infrences from your book. 
 
 
 
Good Luck

posted on Tuesday, October 20, 2009 at 11:01 AM by Prashant Mathur


Dharmesh very right on Point 2, the PPC campaign. There has been a report that only 8% of Internet Users Account for 85% of all Clicks 
<a>http://www.skill-guru.com/blog/2009/10/18/how-many-users-click-on-internet-or-google-ads/

posted on Tuesday, October 20, 2009 at 11:02 AM by skillguru


Excellent article. I agree, focusing on creating content is the key to building a Internet marketing strategy.  
 
 
 
Congradulations on publishing your first book. Not for money, by for authority. That is the value in becoming an author. Now you will get much more respect because you are an 'author'.

posted on Tuesday, October 20, 2009 at 11:04 AM by Curt


Dharmesh, 
You've talked me into buying your book, which is no small feat I assure you. Your book only seems to be available in the USA. I live in Paris and am big on saving trees and reducing the carbon impact of shipping things around the planet. But I would be happy to pay you for a download of the content. 
Best regards, 
Carsten

posted on Tuesday, October 20, 2009 at 11:40 AM by Carsten Sprotte


Excellent post, although I'm not sure I agree with the rationale of #2. Irrationality of competitors with deep pockets is always a risk -- and frankly, can be a risk in social media as well. People can spend money to get attention many ways. I think the multi-unit nature of PPC auctions also mitigates that risk -- one rich and irrational bidder simply cannot monopolize the market. (And you, as a ninja PPC entrepreneur can often leverage their advertising against them.) 
 
I agree wholeheartedly with the rest of your suggestions though, and I'm eagerly awaiting my copy of Inbound Marketing from Amazon. :-) 
 
By the way, the report that only 8% of users account for 85% clicks was on DISPLAY advertising, not PPC advertising in Google. There are many reasons why those are two very different vehicles... but that's a post unto itself.

posted on Tuesday, October 20, 2009 at 11:40 AM by Scott Brinker


It's a good concept and you can definitely sell a potential investor on the strength of a pre-existing brand as a barrier to entry, or at least a valuable asset, but you need to HAVE that marketing asset already in place for it to be worth something. 
 
This is exactly the thing that those giant companies your startup might be competing with already have in spades - tons of links, an established brand, a place in the market pantheon, etc.. 
 
If you're a marketing genius/ninja you'll have to go out and get that strong market position before you can sell it to a VC or investor. And, by the time you get there you probably won't need any VC money any more since you can monetize that market attention by selling an actual product instead of selling your company. 
 
So ... it's a great concept in general but keep in mind it's not a good choice for playing the "investor game"; it's more for bootstrapping startups, or companies with other barriers to entry 
 
 
 
 
 

posted on Tuesday, October 20, 2009 at 12:12 PM by Dobes Vandermeer


Congratulation on the book release. 
 
 
 
Great article with lots of value.. Thank you for sharing this..As a startup - it definetly provides me info on areas where I should focus.. 
 
 
 
Thanks again! 
 
 
 
Vinod Vijayan 
 
CEO & President 
 
OwnFair.com

posted on Tuesday, October 20, 2009 at 12:41 PM by Vinod Vijayan


Dharmesh, 
This post is inspiring, educational, and just plain - good content. If new your book is anything like this, I am sure to learn alot more from you. 
Thanks

posted on Tuesday, October 20, 2009 at 12:44 PM by Jeremy Victor


Thanks so much to everyone for your kind words. Glad you liked the article. 
 
Special thanks to all those that bought the book (and tweeted it!). Your support has helped make the book #188 now of all books sold on Amazon.

posted on Tuesday, October 20, 2009 at 12:51 PM by Dharmesh Shah


Now this is some honest information void of any fluff. I can't wait to read the whole book. Learnt a lot. You are a very selfless person and I admire your for sharing great insights.

posted on Tuesday, October 20, 2009 at 1:04 PM by Ram Dutt


Congratulations on your book and thank you for sharing this information with us.... The first step in the acquisition of wisdom is silence, the second listening, the third memory, the fourth practice, the fifth teaching others. 
- Solomon Ibn Gabriol -

posted on Tuesday, October 20, 2009 at 1:41 PM by Kemi B. Fadojutimi


Great post and the book looks quite well thought out. I ordered, can't wait to read it. Best of luck with it. 
 
I speak to other small business owners ALL the time about needing to create content for their sites, content content content! One of them now every time he sees me says "Hey content guy!". This is the single most underused resource for small business. Write more content!

posted on Tuesday, October 20, 2009 at 1:44 PM by Jason Short


Nice article - I just ordered your book. Thanks for sharing your knowledge in this area!

posted on Tuesday, October 20, 2009 at 2:42 PM by Jason Barbaria


Dharmesh, 
 
Interesting spin on using inbound marketing for startups. The idea of making yourself "competition proof" is intriguing, but it seems counter-intuitive since one of the main philosophies of inbound marketing is giving away as much knowledge as you can. How do you reconcile those two things - being unique and "untouchable" and being transparent and giving?

posted on Tuesday, October 20, 2009 at 3:18 PM by John McTigue


It is great to see a lot of information put forth here in one post. How could I now resist not to go out and buy the book. 
 
It is so much true to create the good content. Yes, it is not easy and takes a lot of time but the better the relevancy and with good key words it is difficult for the competition to get in to your space. The key is to sustain it and getting good at it. 
 
THanks again for a great post.

posted on Tuesday, October 20, 2009 at 9:37 PM by Shruti


Dharmesh, congrats on the release of the book and the funding. I'm so bought into the points you make in your post, and doing exactly this to build barriers to entry for my startup.  
 
Its so much easier for entrepreneurs to practice inbound marketing, since marketers in bigger companies have so much pressure from above to practice interruption marketing and only focus on things that can be measured in current quarter pipeline contribution.

posted on Tuesday, October 20, 2009 at 9:48 PM by Jeff Ernst


Dear Dharmesh, 
 
 
 
Many thanks for these insights. I am trying many of these things, but never had a term for it. I forwarded to my sales team as this reinforces the strategies I have been pursuing. 
 
 
 
I will plan to pick up a copy of your book (assuming I can get it locally here in Thailand). 
 
 
 
All the best, 
 
 
 
Michael

posted on Tuesday, October 20, 2009 at 11:38 PM by Michael Barricelli


Excellent points! Agreed that valuable content goes a long way in attracting and retaining customers to your website. 
Best, 
C.Krish

posted on Wednesday, October 21, 2009 at 10:11 AM by CKrish


Congratulations on raising new VC money and also on the release of the book. 
 
I whole heartedly agree with you on PPC vs SEO. 
 
One of the reasons why I like SEO so much (other than the fact that ~75% of clicks happen on natural search results and it is free) is because typically no hard sales pitch is involved. When I see the PPC listing, it is a blatant sales pitch - buy this, buy that. 
 
The organic search on the other hand results often lead to informative articles often lead to blog articles, newsletters, data sheets educating me about to solve the problem before I am ready to buy.

posted on Wednesday, October 21, 2009 at 11:37 AM by Gopal Shenoy


Congratulations on raising new VC money and also on the release of the book. 
 
I whole heartedly agree with you on PPC vs SEO. 
 
One of the reasons why I like SEO so much (other than the fact that ~75% of clicks happen on natural search results and it is free) is because typically no hard sales pitch is involved. When I see the PPC listing, it is a blatant sales pitch - buy this, buy that. 
 
The organic search on the other hand results often lead to informative articles often lead to blog articles, newsletters, data sheets educating me about to solve the problem before I am ready to buy.

posted on Wednesday, October 21, 2009 at 11:37 AM by Gopal Shenoy


Great article! I have had a start up for couple of years (software consulting) and fortunately had clients from day one. Finally, got some infrastructure setup so that I have the bandwidth to add clients by truckload (your phrase). This article was a very good start , I would say. 
 
Looking forward to reading your book! 
 
Thanks 
Swanand Mokashi 
Founder and President 
Malaika Consultants LLC

posted on Wednesday, October 21, 2009 at 1:56 PM by Swanand Mokashi


Hmmmm am I missing something here? I think by now everyone knows SEO and content are 'THE' things to do if you want a good stream of traffic and don't wanna spend too much on marketing.  
 
People...wake up, this is old news, nothing new over here.

posted on Wednesday, October 21, 2009 at 4:19 PM by vick


Great post and nice advice for those who wants to advertise their company on web.  
 

posted on Thursday, October 22, 2009 at 7:13 AM by John


I bought a Kindle because of you :-) A big thanks because originally I canceled my order from the first day you could order it in Germany, to be shipped from the US. To save some money. Ah, that felt good. Saving $$. Then I told my wife that this would be a great christmas present. But today, I wanted to buy your book on amazon in Germany but it was not available. Neither from amazon.co.uk and then, on the US-site I saw that there is a Kindle edition... that clinched it. Handling paper books such as "The Ultimate Guide to Google Adwords" to optimize our Web Software business in front of a laptop is a nuisance anyway.

posted on Thursday, October 22, 2009 at 8:08 AM by Patrick Thomas


Great book, Dharmesh - and while it echoes a lot of things already said, the true difference is in execution...hope a few will make good of it! 
 
 
 
Cheers!

posted on Thursday, October 22, 2009 at 3:07 PM by manan


I bought the Kindle version of the book and saved some money. Thanks for making it available there too. 
 
The book is great at showing both the marketing and technical activities needed to make inbound marketing work.

posted on Thursday, October 22, 2009 at 3:38 PM by Paul Jin


Great article. I was considering adding a PPC campaign into the mix but after reading this (I'm already a Hubspot customer) I think I'll just spend more time creating valuable content. My biggest challenge frankly is time. As a new business owner I am pulled in so many directions during the course of a week that I struggle to find the time to dedicate toward writing a blog on a regular basis and creating new content. Does anyone have a time machine?

posted on Friday, October 23, 2009 at 4:13 PM by Stefan T. Frey


Bought the book. Scheduled the tweet. 
 
Great content only works if you've got great distribution (e.g. SEO). Great products never distribute themselves. Bullet 4 only works if you also do bullet 3 or some other type of effective distribution. 
 
Apple has the greatest products in the world but they still built 274 stores to distribute them. Twitter is great but they still got a lot of word of mouth by working SXSW 2007 (I think).

posted on Saturday, October 24, 2009 at 1:21 AM by Nivi


Good article! Agree with the PPC thing. "You’re basically at the mercy of the stupidest market entrant." 
Thanks!

posted on Saturday, October 24, 2009 at 4:52 AM by Mandar Shinde


congrats! Fan of your work. I am confident your book will do well. Can't wait to get my hands on it and also see the outcome of your funding! 

posted on Sunday, October 25, 2009 at 12:44 AM by Pam Moore


Agree. As a Hubspot customer and recent purchaser of your book, I can attest that our company has done much better with Inbound leads than Outbound and we expend most of our resources on SEO and Content.

posted on Friday, October 30, 2009 at 6:54 AM by Terence Lee


Great Article - Thanks for all your efforts. 
 
Raj | smile@theConnectDot.com  
{if you need a free website} { http://www.theConnectHome.com }

posted on Friday, October 30, 2009 at 8:00 PM by Raj


If anyone need website design, logo design, business card design or any other design, please check out the crowdsourcing community of the world's best graphic designers. 
The designers will simultaneously work on your design need and you choose the design of your choice. 
 
Check it out <a>http://www.contestdesigns.com

posted on Tuesday, November 03, 2009 at 9:50 AM by grant tailor


If anyone need website design, logo design, business card design or any other design, please check out the crowdsourcing community of the world's best graphic designers. 
The designers will simultaneously work on your design need and you choose the design of your choice. 
 
Check it out <a>http://www.contestdesigns.com<a>

posted on Tuesday, November 03, 2009 at 9:52 AM by g


If anyone need website design, logo design, business card design or any other design, please check out the crowdsourcing community of the world's best graphic designers. 
The designers will simultaneously work on your design need and you choose the design of your choice. 
 
Check it out <a>www.contestdesigns.com

posted on Tuesday, November 03, 2009 at 9:53 AM by grant tailor


If anyone need website design, logo design, business card design or any other design, please check out the crowdsourcing community of the world's best graphic designers. 
The designers will simultaneously work on your design need and you choose the design of your choice. 
 
Check it out ContestDesigns.com

posted on Tuesday, November 03, 2009 at 9:54 AM by grant tailor


...wonderful to be reminded on the fundamentals of inbound marketing. It is so easy to forget these principles when day-by-day tasks pile on and a level of success is achieved. 
 
Thanks for very practical and implementable advice! 
 
A tip of the hat to all Entrepreneurs... 
 
Ky Ekinci 
Co-Founder 
Office Divvy 
------------ 
On the Web: http://OfficeDivvy.com 
On Twitter: @OfficeDivvy 
 
 

posted on Tuesday, November 03, 2009 at 8:46 PM by Ky Ekinci


Great stuff Dharmesh! Good SEO can take you so far, and IMHO, I think it gives you a greater return if you're in the B2B sector

posted on Wednesday, November 04, 2009 at 4:01 PM by Andrew


I am glad to read this.....working on a new website at the moment. The question arouse how much to "put aside" for PPC - I said "For the moment nothing"- I got disbelieve. Well, I'll find out if I can pull this off like I've planned. 
(got your book in hand!Looking forward to digging into it)  
Thanks Dharmesh

posted on Wednesday, November 11, 2009 at 11:32 PM by susanna


You can get help with your website design on <a href="http://www.contestdesigns.com>www.contestdesigns.com

posted on Thursday, November 12, 2009 at 2:48 AM by grant tailor


Why pay for what you can get for free? Go with SEO.

posted on Friday, November 13, 2009 at 2:33 AM by Ed Martin


Great tips Dharmesh! Learned a lot.. 
 
Thank you, 
 
Robert Reddy 
Co-founder, http://www.jaihodesi.com 
An Indian Community Portal

posted on Tuesday, November 17, 2009 at 9:14 PM by Robert Reddy


Isn't Creating content that kicks butt a form of barrier to entry precisely because it creates a form of IP?

posted on Wednesday, December 09, 2009 at 6:30 AM by Mathew


Comments have been closed for this article.