OnStartups

Wimps Wait. Revolutionaries Release Early.

Posted by Dharmesh Shah on November 18, 2008 in agile 26 Comments

If you are not a believer in “Release Early, Release Often” you can safely stop reading now.  No sense in clouding your passionately held opinions with my passionately held, and ill-defended opinions.  My best wishes to you.

On the other hand, if you’re as passionate about the power of the “Release Early” model  as I am, then this article is just for you. 

If one of these tickles your fancy, please feel free to share it.  Lets improve the world, one waiter at a time.  [waiter, as in “one who waits”.  Oh wait, those kinds of waiters wait too.  Screw it, you know what I mean].

Enjoy.

14 Sound Bites And Insights On Releasing Early

1.  Wimps wait.  Revolutionaries release early.

Suggested reading:  “Rules for Revolutionaries” by Guy Kawasaki.  Guy’s my hero. 

2.  Failing to scale is excusable.  Failing to release is not.

3.  Don’t hug your software too hard.  If you love it, set it free.

4.  You will more often regret when you were reluctant than when you released.

5.  At the end of the day…just ship it!

6.  You don’t get a first chance to make a second impression.

I realize the above statement makes no logical sense.  But, the argument against releasing early is often “you don’t get a second chance to make a first impression” and I wanted to twist it into something clever for my purposes.  I failed.  No worries.  This one’s on the house.

6.  It’s better to release early, and irritate some users than not release, and not have users at all.

7.  If it helps you release earlier, know that my software sucks more than yours. 

8.  Ship it now.  Why wait until tomorrow to learn what you can today?

9.  There are always 10 pretty good reasons not to release.  But, they’re not that good — so just release.

10.  Software in the wild always trumps software in waiting.

11.  You’re overestimating the degree to which people give a flying flip.  Get over yourself and just freakin’ ship it already.

12.  To succeed, you need to be remarkable.  To be remarkable, you actually have to release something.

Suggested reading:  Seth Godin’s blog.  Seth’s my hero.

13.  Better to release early and be ridiculed than just ridiculed.

14.  No heroes and legends are created by software that almost shipped.

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That’s about the best I can do.  I have a feeling you can do better.  Post your best pithy insight on the awesomeness of “releasing early” in the comments.